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In Rajia Hassib’s novel “A Pure Heart,” an Egyptologist excavates her own grief in the wake of the Arab Spring.
“The Long Accomplishment: A Memoir of Hope and Struggle in Matrimony” is Rick Moody’s attempt to come to terms with his troubled domestic life.
Robert Wilson’s “Barnum: An American Life” doesn’t draw direct parallels with Donald Trump, but the links are certainly there.
A new biography by Shlomo Avineri argues for a reconsideration of one of the most influential political thinkers of recent times.
A selection of recent books of interest; plus, a peek at what our colleagues around the newsroom are reading.
In “This Is Not Propaganda,” Peter Pomerantsev describes traveling the world to discover ever new forms of media manipulation.
One novel transports readers to 1970s Spain, roiled by the Basque militants; another is about a Spanish-born MI6 agent; a third follows a political prisoner in Uruguay.
Tope Folarin’s debut novel, “A Particular Kind of Black Man,” stages a first-generation coming-of-age in white conservative America.
In her new book, Candace Bushnell — now middle-aged — dives back into New York City dating life.
Sarah Broom’s first book tells the story of a shotgun house in New Orleans and its fate before and after Hurricane Katrina.
In “Trick Mirror,” the New Yorker staff writer delivers essays on everything from online self-exposure to drug-induced euphoria and the scam economy.
In 1992, Jill Johnston wrote for the Book Review about Richard Bly’s 1990 book “Iron John,” in which he analyzed classic fairy tales and applied them to 20th-century masculinity.
Carl Hulse talks about “Confirmation Bias,” and De’Shawn Charles Winslow discusses “In West Mills.”
In 1992, Jill Johnston wrote for the Book Review about Richard Bly’s 1990 book “Iron John,” in which he analyzed classic fairy tales and applied them to 20th-century masculinity.
It might surprise you to learn it was “Marjorie Morningstar,” which she rereads every year.
Imagining all the reasons you might not make time for your book.
‘This routine isn’t the routine I had 20 years ago. I wouldn’t have exercised. I would have had a boozy brunch with friends.’
Set in the wilds of Michigan’s Upper Peninsula, the linked stories in Philip Caputo’s “Hunter’s Moon” deftly probe his characters’ emotional wounds.
Marilyn Stasio’s Crime column stalks a lonely shop clerk in Norway, an almost kidnapped California bank clerk and a jittery Manhattan apartment sitter.
Readers respond to recent issues of the Sunday Book Review.

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