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Her previous memoirs delved into her parents’ traumatic influence. Now, in “On Sunset,” she introduces the beloved Old World grandparents who raised her.
Young adult and middle grade fiction to educate children in the vast terrain of Native American history.
David W. Blight’s “Frederick Douglass: Prophet of Freedom” is an ambitious and empathetic biography of a major American life.
“Her hovering is so fierce that it penetrates the walls,” said Sonny Mehta, the company’s chairman and editor in chief.
The Library of Congress says it has digitized the largest collection of Theodore Roosevelt’s papers in the world.
Judith Newman’s latest Help Desk column ventures into the minefield of marriage, dating, desire — and divorce.
The judges cited her use of dark humor to explore tribalism, state-sponsored terrorism, social division and sexual and political oppression.
In Perumal Murugan’s “One Part Woman,” a religious festival allows childless women to sleep with men other than their husbands, in the hope of becoming pregnant.
In “The Poison Squad,” Deborah Blum tells the story of the early-20th-century U.S.D.A. inspector who changed the way we think about food.
Marielle Heller directs a true story of literary fraud, set amid the bookstores and gay bars of early ’90s Manhattan.
Jenkins talks about his adaptation of James Baldwin’s “If Beale Street Could Talk,” and Wolitzer discusses the adaptation of her novel “The Wife.”
Writing into her 90s — her last book was published last month — Dr. Midgley challenged with wit and verve the primacy of science as arbiter of reality.
“CoDex 1962,” by the Icelandic cult writer Sjon, is a trippy, philosophical, shaggy-dog novel combining a love story, a crime mystery and a science-fiction thriller in one.
Neil deGrasse Tyson on the relationship between science and war, what he would do with a $700 billion research budget and why he’s in favor of a space force.
The Japanese novelist’s latest book, “Killing Commendatore,” features a stymied artist, a haunted painting and a host of paranormal mysteries.
A selection of books published this week; plus, a peek at what our colleagues around the newsroom are reading.
New books by Jose Antonio Vargas, José Olivarez and Julissa Arce explore what being part of mixed-status families, in which either they or their relatives were undocumented, has meant to them.
A journalist’s traumatic story of epilepsy and his struggle to have it treated seriously, and properly, in his college years.
Professor Lobel was among the first historians to explore the economic and social elements of city life in the 19th century through the lens of eating.
“Unsheltered” threads the story of a present-day family struggling in New Jersey with that of a 19th-century science teacher who had lived on the same property.

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